boiling tea kettle

My Love Affair with Tea

I was young when my love affair began, not even walking. I used to sit on my father’s lap and steal the dregs of his tea. At the time he drank a strong brew with 4 sugars that we used to affectionately call a “squaddie”. I am pretty sure in hindsight that my first experience of tea was, in fact, more sugar than tea. Luckily I have experienced a much wider education in tea since then.

Tea has always been there for me

After my first traumatic break up as a teen, I drank tea with my mom and confirmed that it was all definitely, absolutely his fault. When I got married I swigged tea while I had an existential crisis over my hair and makeup. Immediately after giving birth (sorry) to my children I demanded a cup of tea, I had to reinvigorate similar to David Tennant as The Doctor just after regeneration. On the day my mother and I realised my grandmother’s health was failing, did we panic? Did we suffer hysterics? No we had a cup of good old tea.

Notice anything?

Tea is a drink that invokes family memories for me. When a person close to you has a problem, sort it over a cup of tea. Need to have a brag or a moan? Much friendlier to do it over a pot of tea. As Sheldon (Big Bang Theory) says, “When people are upset the cultural convention is to bring them a hot beverage.” No one so far as I know has been insulted by the offer of tea. Gluten-free, vegan, sugar-free, suitable for all religions and all dietary requirements. Tea transverses all age, culture and gender gaps. At the outbreak of war in England, the government took over the distribution of tea as it was considered essential to the moral of the country. It is the single greatest unifying force on the planet earth. There is a reason people refer to tea as a hug in a cup. Continue reading